Geography, Environment, Pilgrimage by Barbara Ambors in Nanzan Guide To Japanese Religion

Nanzan Guide To Japanese Religion (origin of the article)

Nanzan Guide To Japanese Religion (origin of the article)

This time I just read a section of the book as it was a recommendation of the provisional dissertation supervisor. So the main reason wasn’t that much the content of this article as its reference, but to understand the relevance of the references I had to read the article (vicious circle, huh?).

It was not boring, that is for sure. It was more of a summary of all the theories about pilgrimages, Shugendo, some other ascetic practices and so on. There were several part of the text that I highlighted because I think I will use them in the future either as a reference itself or as a link to something else. There is not really much to say about the article itself even though it stretches over almost 11 pages. I just didn’t find that many interesting point in there that would be work mentioning apart from one which is that modern pilgrimages are often measured against the standards of the past in the means of transport and such. In fact, all the books and article I have read so far do make some references to the differences in transportation and they link it to the pilgrim in a certain way as if the pilgrim was choosing a different difficulty of the pilgrimage depending on what transport he/she chooses. I have to make a note here that I do not want to do that in my dissertation.

And just to finish this off, I’ll write down the Japanese authors that I will need to research a bit more and read their works when in Japan, followed by few non-Japanese authors that for some reason intrigued me.

Japanese authors:

  • Gorai Shigeru
  • Hayami Tasuku
  • Hoshino Eiki
  • Kitagawa Joseph
  • Shinjo Tsunezo
  • Shinno Toshikazu

Non-Japanese authors

  • Ambros Barbara
  • Foard James
  • Hardacre Helen
  • LaFleur William
  • MacWilliams Mark
  • Siedel Anna
  • Smyers Karen
  • Turner Victor and Edith Turner
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